1929 - New British Economic Invasion - Covenant  Oyhanarte - D'abernon.

This new British economic lock, it was an own policy "pro UK establishment" of the time, a good transversal part of the political forces and that the pact was merely a revised and expanded in times previously agreed version Hipolito Yrigoyen.

In fact it was the Argentine government which proposed that agreement during the last government of Yrigoyen and indeed was negotiated by Argentine Foreign Minister Horacio Oyhanarte and the English diplomat Edward D'Abernon, who had important role in the foreign policy of his country after the First World War, and signed by both parties, although it did not reach to be ratified by parliament following the coup of General José Félix Uriburu of September 6, 1930.

The Argentine problem was that the Britain since 1922 had begun to rethink its imperial relationship with colonies and already in a conference with representatives of the same in 1923 in London had begun to talk of giving them business advantages, such as not buying stuff goods in third markets when they are produced within the cluster of future nations.

That benefiting clearly to countries like Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa and harmed, also clearly, traditional providers as the two nations of the Rio de la Plata, Argentina and Uruguay, since all those were able to provide meat and cereals, should join the claims of farmers own the UK, also claimed protectionist measures.

In fact it was the Argentine government which proposed that agreement during the last government of  Yrigoyen and indeed was negotiated by Chancellor Horacio Oyhanarte and the diplomat Edward D'Abernon, who had important role in the foreign policy of his country after the World War I, and signed by both parties, although not enough to be ratified by parliament following the coup of General José Félix Uriburu of September 6, 1930.

 What is today, if it had ratified, we would know as Oyhanarte Covenant - D'Abernon, was led by Yrigoyen himself through Senator Diego Luis Molinari, signed by the president himself on November 8, 1929 and voted favorably by the House of deputies on the night of 12 to 13 December of that year, but was delayed in the Senate, for the perennial problems that the ruling party had in the Senate.

The treaty, inspired by "buy who buys us" as asked the Sociedad Rural Argentina (SRA), a spokeswoman for the greenhouses, or similarly on the principle of "reciprocal purchasing, as we propitiate," in the words of Yrigoyen clearly tended to benefit the UK asserted that this would continue the supply of railway equipment, much more expensive than the U.S., in return continue to buy meat.